RBC denies reading messages

It’s another question mark about your privacy and Facebook.  The New York Times alleges the social media giant allowed over 150 businesses, including the Royal Bank of Canada, Netflix and Spotify to read private messages.  RBC is denying the allegation but has admitted to being given permission to send messages to Facebook users to advertise a new app.

Another Canadian arrest in China

A third Canadian is behind bars in China.  Global Affairs Canada confirmed the arrest but did not provide any other details.  The arrest comes as tension grows between Canada and China after a top executive of China-based telecom giant Huawei was arrested in Vancouver at the request of American officials.

Cash, not credit, for weed

Canada’s privacy watchdog wants Canadians to buy their cannabis with cash.  The Privacy Commissioner says because pot is illegal in most countries outside of Canada, marijuana users need to be careful with their personal information because those countries could deny entry to pot smokers.  He says avoid using credit cards and pay with cash instead in order to protect your privacy.

New charges laid in private school sexual assault

More charges have been laid against students at a prestigious Toronto private school.   Allegations of sexual and physical assault were made last month when videos appeared on-line.  Police say they have charged seven students, all members of the St. Micheal’s College junior football team.

Sugary booze bad for young people

Health Canada says sugary, pre-mixed alcoholic drinks are a threat to young people.  The federal agency wants to reduce the alcohol content in the large, single serve cans.  Research suggests the alcohol content is a public health risk.  The move comes after a Quebec girl died after drinking one of these drinks in March.